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Post Roads & Iron Horses
Transportation in Connecticut from Colonial Times to the Age of Steam
Richard DeLuca




The Driftless Connecticut Series
Garnet Books
Wesleyan University Press
2011 • 268 pp. 47 illus., 7 maps. 7 1/4 x 9 1/4"
Connecticut / History


$35.00 Hardcover, 978-0-8195-6856-4

$27.99 Ebook, 978-0-8195-7173-1

Check your ebook retailer or local library for ebook availability.



“(T)he story isn’t just about the technical side of the transportation evolution in the state. It’s the story of the state itself, involving business, scandal, hard work, danger, and some of the great characters in American history, all of whom were a part of helping develop the intricate systems that put Connecticut residents on the roads and rails.”—Staff, Cheshire Herald

The fascinating history of turnpikes, steamboats, canals, railroads, and trolleys in Connecticut

Post Roads & Iron Horses is the first book to look in detail at the turnpikes, steamboats, canals, railroads, and trolleys (street railroads) that helped define Connecticut and shape New England. Advances in transportation technology during the nineteenth century transformed the Constitution State from a rough network of colonial towns to an industrial powerhouse of the Gilded Age. From the race to build the Farmington Canal to the shift from water to rail transport, historian and transportation engineer Richard DeLuca gives us engaging stories and traces the significant themes that emerge as American innovators and financiers, lawyers and legislators, struggle to control the movement of passengers and goods in southern New England. The book contains over fifty historical images and maps, and provides an excellent point of view from which to interpret the history of New England as a whole. This is an indispensable reference book for those interested in Connecticut history and a great gift for transportation buffs of all kinds.

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Reviews:

"The fascinating history of our state's turnpikes, steamboats, canals, railroads, and trolleys (is) found in Post Roads & Iron Horses: Transportation in Connecticut from Colonial Times to the Age of Steam by Richard DeLuca. Containing more than 50 historic images and maps, it provides an excellent point of view from which to interpret the history of New England as a whole."Connecticut Explored

“…a handsome new volume in Wesleyan University Press’s Driftless Connecticut Series.”—Alan Bisbort, Sunday Republican American

“DeLuca’s descriptions of the challenges in building early roads around physical obstacles may pique a reader’s interest in researching local transportation even further. This book, however, is about far more than roads. DeLuca discusses bridges, ferries, stagecoaches and turnpikes, steamships, and trains, and he takes readers on a journey through the historical highways and byways of colonization, industry, and transportation in Connecticut.”Maine Antiques Digest

Endorsements:

“This is the first comprehensive history of the development of transportation in Connecticut, as well as the first major work of each of the fields covered in over a generation. Post Roads & Iron Horses strikes the perfect balance between rich detail and highly readable prose.”Walter Woodward, Connecticut State Historian



RICHARD DELUCA has worked as a transportation planner in Connecticut for ten years and written on regional transportation for Connecticut History and the Encyclopedia of Connecticut History Online. He is the author of We, the People! Bay Area Activism in the 1960s, and lives in Cheshire, Connecticut.



A Driftless Connecticut Series Book
This book is a 2011 selection in The Driftless Connecticut Series,
for an outstanding book in any field on a Connecticut topic
or written by a Connecticut author.
The Driftless Connecticut Series is funded by the
Beatrice Fox Auerbach Foundation Fund
at the Hartford Foundation for Public Giving.
For more information and a complete list of books in The Driftless Connecticut Series,
please visit us online at http://www.wesleyan.edu/wespress/driftless.







Thu, 23 Oct 2014 12:41:38 -0500