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Uncle John
Portraits of a True Yankee Farmer
Georgia Sheron; Ann Beattie, intro.




Bauhan
2013 • 156 pp. 150 illus. 11 x 8 1/2"
Regional Photography / New England History


$35.00 Hardcover, 978-0-87233-160-0



Evocative black-and-white photographs of a lifelong Connecticut farmer who adhered to traditions even as the world changed around him

Over the course of a dozen years, photographer Georgia Sheron took numerous photographs of her next-door neighbor, “Uncle John” Ludorf, a farmer who plowed with horses and milked cows by hand into his late nineties. Her striking prints, accompanied by John’s observations as garnered in a number of interviews, offer an artful, nuanced, and unsentimental look at a bygone way of life.

I love the way certain photographs overwhelm with the sheer immediacy and vastness of the terrain, so that it takes a few moments to realize there’s a tiny person there. In other photographs, we’re persuaded to perceive the way the photographer does: John’s spread fingers are not so very different from the splayed branches of the towering tree; his veins are only the living version of the shape he holds." —From the introduction by Ann Beattie

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Reviews / Endorsements



“Uncle John is a wonderful documentation of every aspect of Yankee farming - from hand broadcasting of seed to dowsing for water to playing old tune on the fiddle for an evening’s recreation -- and a wonderful documentation of the life of a remarkable man. The combination of Georgia Sheron’s gorgeous photos with the sensitively presented oral histories creates an intimate, compelling, and pleasurable evocation of a then vanishing and now vanished way of life.”—Jeremy Brecher, author of Brass Valley and History from Below

“Which is the greater miracle, that the farmer continued to farm his land way past when everyone else stopped doing it this way, or was it the miracle that Georgia caught it on film with such clarity and straightforward images? Both are amazing acts of appreciation for a beautiful way of life.
I admire Georgia’s resisting the temptation to make Uncle John into a heroic figure - the last of a noble breed, etc. Perhaps he was an anachronism, but he remained true to his idea - dedicated and committed - which is a very contemporary quality.”—John Cohen, musician, photographer, filmmaker



Georgia Sheron has worked in portrait, fine art, editorial and commercial photography for more than forty years. Her work has appeared in myriad publications, among them The Sunday New York Times, Connecticut Magazine, Vermont Magazine, and Yankee Magazine. She makes her home in Waterbury, Connecticut.



Wed, 18 Oct 2017 13:26:36 -0500