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The Deathbed Playboy
Philip Dacey




Eastern Washington University Press
1999 • 88 pp. 6 x 9"
Poetry / Poetry - American

List $14.00, Web $8.40 Paperback, 978-0-910055-47-5



A collection of poetry by Philip Dacey.

Once described by Dave Smith as "a one-man symphony," Dacey here ranges widely in tones, strategies, and forms, a diversity appropriate for one who characteristically mediates on American identity. In these poems, Dacey winds together many strands—our national pop culture, the vagaries of human discourse, death, and sexuality—and frames them in a narrative as comic as it is plangent.

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Endorsements:

"Dacey plays, as Frost would have it, for mortal stakes. I love his unsolemn seriousness and his rangy wit."—Stephen Dunn

"A poetic version of Raymond Carver, Dacey sees in painful difficulties the wonder of compensation. His poems are letters addressed to God about the problematical nature of salvation."—Frank Allen, American Book Review



PHILIP DACEY's five previous books of poetry include The Boy Under the Bed (The Johns Hopkins U. Press, 1981) and The Man with Red Suspenders (Milkweed, 1986). He co-edited Strong Measures: Contemporary American Poetry in Traditional Forms (HarperCollins, 1986). The latest of his many chapbooks is What's Empty Weighs the Most: 24 Sonnets (Black Dirt Press, 1997). Widely published in periodicals and anthologies, he teaches at the Minnesota State University in Marshall. Awards include two NEA fellowships, two Pushcart Prizes, Bush and Loft-McKnight fellowships, and a Fulbright Lectureship in Yugoslavia, as well as prizes from Poetry Northwest, Yankee, Prairie Schooner, Flyway and The Nebraska Review.






Sun, 13 Apr 2014 17:13:34 -0500