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Changing the Culture of Academic Medicine
Perspectives of Women Faculty
Linda H. Pololi




Dartmouth College Press
2010 • 200 pp. 6 x 9"
Medicine & Public Health / Women's Studies

$24.95 Paperback, 978-1-58465-567-1
$22.99 Ebook, 978-1-58465-946-4

Check your ebook retailer or local library for ebook availability.



“Pololi argues that academic medicine’s culture marginalizes women faculty and is a barrier to the fulfillment of its mission. . . . This book is important for medical historians, policy makers, and educators as well as students. Recommended.”Choice

A penetrating and personal look at a major problem in our nation’s medical schools affecting how doctoring is taught and how medicine is practiced

Over the past twenty-five years, steadily increasing numbers of women have graduated as physicians, in sufficient numbers to be well represented in senior and leadership positions in the nation’s academic medical centers. Yet women’s expected advancement has stalled. Women rarely hold decision-making positions, and female department chairs or deans continue to be exceedingly rare.

Why is this the case?

Pololi’s study, based on extensive interviews, illuminates medical school culture and shows a sharp disconnect between the values of individual faculty members and the values of academic institutions of medicine. Pololi looks closely at women medical faculty’s experiences as outsiders in medicine, opening a window into medical culture. She argues that placing more women and people of color in leadership positions would provide transformative and more effective leadership to improve health care and would help address current inequities in the health care provided to different racial and cultural groups.

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Reviews:

“The author feels that participation of diverse voices, including women, men, and minorities, will create a more transparent and less hierarchical organization in academic medicine. The deficiencies and discrepancies experienced by women physicians are highlighted and solutions offered to improve the current environment for medical students, residents, and faculty regardless of sex, race, or ethnicity. Understanding the experience of women can hopefully improve the academic medical system for all physicians and ultimately improve patient care.”JAMA, Journal
of the American Medical Association



Author Photo

LINDA H. POLOLI has served in professorial and administrative posts in the schools of medicine at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Brown University, East Carolina University, and the University of Massachusetts, and in numerous educational advisory groups, including the National Center of Leadership in Academic Medicine (ECU), of which she was the founding director, and the National Initiative on Gender, Culture and Leadership in Medicine (Brandeis University).






Fri, 8 Aug 2014 12:04:10 -0500