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Citizenship, Faith, and Feminism
Jewish and Muslim Women Reclaim Their Rights
Jan Feldman



Brandeis Series on Gender, Culture, Religion, and Law

Brandeis University Press
2011 • 256 pp. 6 x 9"
Women's Studies / Religion / Politics

$29.95 Paperback, 978-1-58465-973-0
$85.00 Hardcover, 978-1-58465-972-3

$27.99 Ebook, 978-1-61168-011-9

Check your ebook retailer or local library for ebook availability.

(Cloth edition is un-jacketed.
Cover illustration is for paperback edition only)



“Also alive and well: feminist activism among Orthodox Jews and Muslims in contemporary Israel, Kuwait, and the United States. So argues Jan Feldman in Citizenship, Faith, and Feminism: Jewish and Muslim Women Reclaim Their Rights. Feldman acknowledges her personal stake in this argument; her last book, Lubavitchers as Citizens, was an ‘attempt to square [her] feminism and nonpartisan humanism . . . with [her] strong attachment to Lubavitch,’ and more recently, she has explained how she became ‘the only professor on campus’—at the University of Vermont, where she teaches political science—in a sheitel.’”—Tablet

The first book to examine religious feminist activists in Israel, the U.S., and Kuwait

Religious women in liberal democracies are “dual citizens” because of their contrasting status as members of both a civic community (in which their gender has no impact on their constitutional guarantee of equal rights) and a traditional religious community (which distributes roles and power based on gender).

This book shows how these “dual citizens”—Orthodox Jewish women in Israel, Muslim women in Kuwait, and women of both those faiths in the U.S.—have increasingly deployed their civic citizenship rights in attempts to reform and not destroy their religions. For them, neither “exit” nor acquiescence to traditional religious gender norms is an option. Instead, they use the narrative of civic citizenship combined with a more authentic, if alternative reading of their faith tradition to improve their status.

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JAN FELDMAN is an associate professor of political science, specializing in political theory, at the University of Vermont. She is the author of Lubavitchers as Citizens: A Paradox of Liberal Democracy.






Wed, 5 Nov 2014 15:33:35 -0500