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Philip Hoff
How Red Turned Blue in the Green Mountain State
Samuel B. Hand, Anthony Marro, Stephen C. Terry




Castleton State College
2011 • 232 pp. 25 illus. 6 1/4 x 9 1/4"
New England History / Vermont


$29.95 Hardcover, 978-1-61168-207-6

$24.99 Ebook, 978-1-61168-032-4

Check your ebook retailer or local library for ebook availability.



“It would be hard to come up with a better-suited trio of authors for this well-chosen topic . . . . Philip Hoff is at its best . . . when it takes a thematic look at Hoff’s tenure, particularly when it examines tow issues in which the governor contrasted with, rather than reflected, the political Zeitgeist — war and race.”—Valley News

This is the story of one of the most exciting and important periods in Vermont history, and of the man most responsible for shaping it

During Philip Hoff's six years as governor of the Green Mountain State (1963–1969), the politics, demographics, economics and government structure of Vermont changed in major and long-lasting ways, and a new liberal tradition took hold. He was an activist governor, pushing new ideas, concepts and programs and challenging the idea that Vermont governors should be caretakers in the way that his predecessors had been.

Hoff very much believed that government was and should be the primary force in bringing about social change, saying that “Every significant decision of our time is going to be made in the governmental arena.” He was quick to support efforts to modernize government operations that he considered obsolete and inefficient. But his influence on the state was profound and long lasting. At the time he left office in January 1969, the Rutland Herald predicted that, “it will be impossible to turn back the clock to the political era of caretaker governors.” Hoff himself left office believing that his six years as an activist governor finally “got Vermont off the dime.” Bill Kearns put it more bluntly, saying that Hoff “picked up the state by the back of the neck and gave it a damned good, much needed shaking.”

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Reviews:

“This is a very thorough account of Hoff’s political career, the political dynamics of a rapidly changing Vermont in the 1960s, and the implications of Hoff’s governorship for Vermont politics and policy after he left office. . . . Terry, Hand, and Marro are to be commended for offering us this fact-filled and analytically rich account of how Vermont politics and policy changed during six eventful years during which Philip H. Hoff served as governor.”—Vermont History



SAMUEL B. HAND is professor emeritus of history at the University of Vermont. ANTHONY MARRO and STEPHEN C. TERRY both covered Hoff as reporters for Vermont newspapers. TERRY later became a U.S. Senate aide, managing editor of the Rutland (VT) Herald, and a utility executive. MARRO was editor of Newsday from 1987 until 2003.






Sun, 5 Oct 2014 14:42:30 -0500