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Dwelling in American
Dissent, Empire, and Globalization
John Muthyala



Re-Mapping the Transnational: A Dartmouth Series in American Studies

Dartmouth College Press
2012 • 260 pp. 6 x 9"
American History / Criticism

$29.95 Paperback, 978-1-61168-249-6
$85.00 Hardcover, 978-1-61168-248-9

$27.99 Ebook, 978-1-61168-250-2

Check your ebook retailer or local library for ebook availability.

(Cloth edition is un-jacketed.
Cover illustration is for paperback edition only)



"This book will be valuable in various disciplines. . . . [A] helpful survey. . . . Highly recommended."—Choice

An original critique of the idea of American empire in the twenty-first century

Globalization is not the Americanization of the world, argues John Muthyala. Rather, it is an uneven social, cultural, economic, and political process in which the policies and aspirations of powerful nation-states are entangled with the interests of other empires, nation-states, and communities. Dwelling in American: Dissent, Empire, and Globalization takes up a bold challenge, critiquing scholarship on American empire that views the United States as either an exceptional threat to the world or the only hope for the future. It does so in order to provincialize America, to understand it from outside the borders of nation and location, and from inside the global networks of trade, power, and culture. Using comparative frames of reference, the book makes its arguments by examining the work of a diverse range of writers including Arundhati Roy (War Talk, Power Politics), Azar Nafisi (Reading Lolita in Tehran), and Thomas Friedman (The World Is Flat).

This is an original, complex, and often bracingly counterintuitive critique of the idea of American empire that will appeal to anyone interested in understanding the complexities of globalization.

Click here for TABLE OF CONTENTS

Endorsements:

“Muthyala’s book is a critique of the unexamined neoliberalism of American studies—and of the seductive power of American global modernity even for its critics. Drawing on everything from novels to policy analysis to academic work to virtual commons polemic, he targets the hollowness of the American imperial colossus and points to the limits and possibilities of insurgency within it. This is critical theory at its best: rigorous, vigorous and convivial as well.”—Antoinette Burton, University of Illinois, author of Empire in Question

“Muthyala proposes an alternative model of globalization, moving from the center–periphery model to one of crosscurrents and dwelling, and his detailed critical and positive readings of exemplary texts demonstrating the superiority of this model will have a strong and groundbreaking effect on the field.”—Daniel T. O’Hara, Temple University



JOHN MUTHYALA is an associate professor of English and department chair at the University of Southern Maine. He is the author of Reworlding America: Myth, History, and Narrative.






Fri, 21 Feb 2014 11:00:35 -0500