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No Laughing Matter
Visual Humor in Ideas of Race, Nationality, and Ethnicity
Angela Rosenthal, ed.; David Bindman, ed.; Adrian W. B. Randolph, ed.



Interfaces: Studies in Visual Culture

Dartmouth
2015 • 328 pp. 124 illus. (12 color) 6 x 9"
Art & Popular Culture / Art & Politics / Literary Criticism - Comics & Graphic Novels

$45.00 Paperback, 978-1-61168-821-4
$39.99 Ebook, 978-1-61168-822-1

Check your ebook retailer or local library for ebook availability.



“The scholarship in this volume is superior across the board and a much-needed contribution to the field of race and representation in Western art... [continued in Reviews below]”—Adrienne Childs, WE.B. Du Bois Research Institute, Harvard University,

The role of race and ethnicity in global humor

In the wake of the Charlie Hebdo attacks, this collection—which gathers scholars in the fields of race, ethnicity, and humor—seems especially urgent. Inspired by Denmark’s Muhammad cartoons controversy, the contributors inquire into the role that racial and ethnic stereotypes play in visual humor and the thin line that separates broad characterization as a source of humor from its power to shock or exploit. The authors investigate the ways in which humor is used to demean or give identity to racial, national, or ethnic groups and explore how humor works differently in different media, such as cartoons, photographs, film, video, television, and physical performance.

This is a timely and necessary study that will appeal to scholars across disciplines.

Click here for TABLE OF CONTENTS

Reviews / Endorsements

“The scholarship in this volume is superior across the board and a much-needed contribution to the field of race and representation in Western art. Approaching the issues of race and stereotype from another angle, that of humor, these essays help us expand our thinking about power, resistance, and ambivalence, complicating already complicated discourse on identity.”
—Adrienne Childs, WE.B. Du Bois Research Institute, Harvard University


"The essays in . . . this outstanding collection focus on selected works of art that characterize racial, ethnic or gender stereotypes within a culture."—ARLIS/NA

“An important contribution to discourses of power and identity. . . . Highly recommended.”
Choice

Awards/Recognition:

Winner of the Choice Outstanding Academic Title (2016)


ANGELA ROSENTHAL was a professor of art history at Dartmouth College. ADRIAN W. B. RANDOLPH is the Leon E. Williams Professor of Art History at Dartmouth. DAVID BINDMAN is emeritus professor of the history of art at University College London.



Fri, 1 Sep 2017 16:33:17 -0500