Shopping Cart Link


Four Way Books







Sign up for our newsletter







Bookmark and Share
Cart
Cart link
Paperback add to cart


For Educators
View cart
Cover image Click for larger image

The Halo
C. Dale Young




Four Way
2016 • 76 pp. 6 x 9"
Poetry - Gay & Lesbian / Poetry / Poetry - Asian

$15.95 Paperback, 978-1-935536-68-0



“In the end, The Halo is about memory. The narrator is remembering his own accident, as well as recollecting a shared, cultural past. The spatial... [continued in Reviews below]”—Hee-Jung Serenity Joo, Hyphen Magazine

A dark, psychological profile of a man/monster’s maturation from adolescence to adulthood

The Halo is quasi-autobiography about a man who has wings and wants desperately to simply be human. Tracking from adolescence through adulthood, it explores an accident that temporarily paralyzes him and exposes him to human weakness all the way to his transformation into something more powerful than even he realizes. It explores a personal evolution from being prey to becoming the hunter.

Praise for C. Dale Young

“Young's poems are so fierce and serrated.” —Jeff Gordinier, New York Times Book Review

“Young is a doctor as well as a poet, and [his work] demonstrates a skilled physician's combination of empathy and formal precision.” —David Orr, NPR

“Sometimes the ability to convey information compactly and quickly has moral grace. [Young's] writing can put garrulous narration or evasive speechifying to shame.” —Robert Pinsky, The Washington Post

“[W]e cannot rely on art to tell us the whole truth or even depend upon those who are supposed to protect us. And yet, [C. Dale Young] is compelled to make visible the darkness around us. Whether or not that itself is an act of tenderness, Young refuses to say for certain. And that is what makes his poetry a crucible where readers must confront their own beliefs—about poetry, society, and themselves.”
—Christopher Hennessy, Ploughshares

Click here for TABLE OF CONTENTS

Reviews / Endorsements

"In the end, The Halo is about memory. The narrator is remembering his own accident, as well as recollecting a shared, cultural past. The spatial layout of the poems evokes the structure of our personal and collective memories. Whether they seem to make perfect sense or whether they are flawed, we are always suspicious of our memories. We always demand more. And this is what makes the collection a story 'not [of] a man made divine but more human."—Hee-Jung Serenity Joo, Hyphen Magazine

“Young is a doctor as well as a poet, and [his poetry] demonstrates a skilled physician's combination of empathy and formal precision.”—David Orr, NPR

“Wild with supernatural imagery, the poems in The Halo detail a rapid spiral into fever dreams as the narrator recovers from a grisly car wreck and comes to terms with the broad wings that stretch from his naked back.”
Shelf Awareness

“In this beautifully written and unsettling collection, Young (Torn) moves through the moments of his speaker’s oft-broken life as he struggles to come to terms with the truths of his body and the world in which he exists.” —Publishers Weekly

“[W]e cannot rely on art to tell us the whole truth or even depend upon those who are supposed to protect us. And yet, [C. Dale Young] is compelled to make visible the darkness around us. Whether or not that itself is an act of tenderness, Young refuses to say for certain. And that is what makes his poetry a crucible where readers must confront their own beliefs--about poetry, society, and themselves.”—Christopher Hennessy, Ploughshares

“But poetry can also demand that we not repair, that we leave torn what is torn. This is Young's great gift. He balances his desire to treat his subjects exquisitely and assiduously with his healthy skepticism about easy resolutions.”—Peter Campion, Los Angeles Review of Books

“[T]he [poems] are preoccupied with human frailty, strength, and lust; with a complex and contradictory relationship with God; and with violence in forms small and large.”—Dilruba Ahmed, Kenyon Review

From the Book:

Not tenderness in the eye but a brute need
to see accurately: over the ridge on a trail
deep in Tennessee, the great poet looked out
and examined the vista that confederate soldiers saw
as they rode over its edge rather than surrender.

I saw only the cliff’s edge and then
estimated the distance down to the bottom
of that dirty ravine. This is what someone with wings
does when he knows he cannot fly: he measures
distance….



C. DALE YOUNG practices medicine full-time and teaches in the Warren Wilson MFA Program for Writers. A recipient of multiple fellowships, his short fiction and poems have appeared widely. He lives in San Francisco.



Wed, 18 Oct 2017 13:38:04 -0500