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Two Stories of Prague
King Bohush The Siblings
Rainer Maria Rilke; Angela Esterhammer, trans.; Angela Esterhammer, intro.




UPNE
1994 • 151 pp. 1 map. End-paper illus. 5 1/2 x 9"
Fiction & Literature

$14.95 Paperback, 978-0-87451-789-7


Trans. from the German

“One of the 20th century's most exquisite poets, Rilke also experimented with prose. The two stories included here are set in Prague, where Rilke was... [continued in Reviews below]”—Library Journal

The first English translation of two stories from Rilke’s earliest prose work.

Two Stories of Prague signifies the maturation of a poet and of a people. Although most readers know Rilke as a mature, cosmopolitan poet, here we can discern a young writer self-consciously exploring his development as a man and his emergence as an artist. Angela Esterhammer writes that in symbolic, stylistic, and biographical terms these stories "record the process by which Rilke fashions himself into an independent, empowered individual."

Reviews / Endorsements

“One of the 20th century's most exquisite poets, Rilke also experimented with prose. The two stories included here are set in Prague, where Rilke was born and raised, and reflect the tensions between the German nationals living there and the Czech-speaking majority . . . They are important for their insight into the development of Rilke's writing. For students of German literature, Esterhammer's excellent introduction is worth the price of the book.” —Library Journal

Two Stories of Prague comes at an opportune moment. New developments in Central Europe . . . [prompt one] to look anew at the historical relationships between the nations, and Rilke's early work again reemerges as an illuminating plea for mutual understanding and sympathy.”—Peter Demetz, Yale University

“Esterhammer shows that in these early, satirically colored narratives Rilke is no timeless aesthete but rather an astute and critical observer . . . These two stories contribute to our understanding of the young Rilke ‘in transition,’ on the way to becoming the great poet we continue to read and admire.”—Steven Scher

Awards/Recognition:

A Choice Outstanding Academic Book Commendation


ANGELA ESTERHAMMER is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature at University of Western Ontario. She is author of Creating States: Studies in the Performative Language of John Milton and William Blake (1994).



Wed, 18 Oct 2017 13:16:47 -0500