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Great Tranquillity
Questions and Answers
Yehuda Amichai; Glenda Abramson, trans.; Tudor Parfitt, trans.




Sheep Meadow
1997 • 86 pp. 6 x 9"
Poetry / History of Israel & Palestine / Jewish Studies

$12.95 Paperback, 978-1-878818-68-3


Trans. from the Hebrew

Reviews / Endorsements



“Amichai has entered that small accidental, permanent company of poets -- Hikmet, Milosz, Vallejo-who speak for each of us and all of us by redefining our nobility, by speaking to us in his voice of many selves. In a time of vile politics and lost gods, Amichai continues to struggle with both in the midst of everyday life.” —Stephen Berg

“Yehuda Amichai begins to look more and more like a truly major poet -- in the strict sense of the term. That is, there's a depth, breadth, and weighty momentum in these subtle and intricate poems of his, even in the slightest, that sounds more and more like the undersong of a people. Who else is dipping his bucket into such a full river of experience and paid-for feelings?” —Ted Hughes

“Two phrases, as I read through Great Tranquillity: Questions and Answers, occurs to me, both characterizing the book for me: "Consummate tenderness" and "Peace at last." The book is the man....The resignation we overhear in these poems, of consummate tenderness, of peace at last, is a triumph beyond loss and grief, towards an art moving and lovely to make one want to live it with the poet as a deep fulfillment of one's own.”—David Ignatow



YEHUDA AMICHAI was born in Wurzburg, Germany, in 1924 and emigrated with his family to Palestine in 1936. Amichai published eleven volumes of poetry in Hebrew, two novels, and a book of short stories. His work has been translated into thirty-seven languages. In 1982, Amichai received the Israel Prize for Poetry, and he became a foreign honorary member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1986. He lived in Jerusalem until his death on September 25, 2000.



Wed, 18 Oct 2017 13:16:17 -0500