Shopping Cart Link


 







Sign up for our newsletter







Discovering Black Vermont
African American Farmers in Hinesburgh, 1790–1890
Elise A. Guyette

University of Vermont Press



Contents

• List of Illustrations
• Preface
• Introduction
• The Invention of Blackness and Whiteness
• The Myth of a Slave-Free, White North
• Historical Themes
• The Effects of Prejudice in the Nineteenth Century
• FOUNDING MOTHERS AND FATHERS OF THE HILL, 1790s–1800s
• Finding Their Place
• Status Prior to Settlement on the Hill
• Settlement
• Civic Life in Hinesburgh
• PEAKS AND VALLEYS ON THE HILL FARMS, 1810s–1820s
• The Clarks at the Top of the Hill
• The Peterses at the Bottom of the Hill
• Economic Expansion and Black Voting Rights
• Prejudice and Religion in Hinesburgh and Huntington
• LIFE AND DEATH ON THE HILL, 1830s–1840s
• The Peterses
• The Clarks
• The Langleys
• PRELUDE TO WAR, 1850–1860
• Coping with the Loss of Wives and Mothers
• Slavery and Colonization Issues
• The Peters, Edwards, and Waters Families
• The Clark, Langley, and Williams Families
• THE CIVIL WAR YEARS, 1861–1865
• Farmers to Soldiers
• Destruction of the Clark Farm
• Discrimination on the Battlefront
• Action on the Battlefront
• POST-CIVIL WAR YEARS
• Bottom of the Hill: Descendants of Hannah and Prince Peters
• Top of the Hill: Descendants of Violet and Shubael Clark
• The South Carolina Langleys
• Some Conclusions: Vulnerable Spaces
• Acknowledgments
• Notes
• Bibliography
• Index

Wed, 18 Oct 2017 13:58:57 -0500