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Water
Towards a Culture of Responsibility
Antoine Frérot; Ángel Gurría, pref.

University of New Hampshire Press



Contents

• PREFACE – Ángel Gurría
• INTRODUCTION: A time to take responsibility
• THE WATER CENTURY
• SATISFYING GROWING NEEDS
• Ever increasing withdrawals from non increasing resources
• Parched megalopolises
• The growing competition for water resources
• Water for agriculture: the highest consumption, the highest waste
• PREVENTING FURTHER LOSS OF THE QUALITY OF OUR WATER RESOURCES
• Sanitation, the “poor relation” of water management
• A long march: controlling agricultural pollution
• The limitations of the “polluter pays” principle
• Escaping the spiral: ever more treatment of water that is ever more polluted
• EUROPE SETS A GOAL: A RETURN TO GOOD WATER QUALITY
• Europe: 30 years of water policies
• Good water status: moving towards a new stage in European water policy
• A disappointment on current water quality
• Quality and quantity: factors separated for too long
• WATER: THE PRIMARY ISSUE FOR HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
• Unsafe drinking water and no sanitation: the world's greatest killers
• Lack of access means a higher price for water
• Wasted human resources, wasted social resources
• Millennium Goals: mixed results in the medium term
• WATER'S FALSE FRIENDS
• CLIMATE CHANGE AND WATER: DISTURBING FACTS
• Unavoidable change, avoidable catastrophe
• The climate changes... and us?
• Foreseeing to be able to act
• The water wars will not happen
• A future with more climatic disasters
• TWO MISPLACED “GOOD IDEAS”: “FREE WATER” AND “USER PAYS FOR ALL”
• Free water: a review of recent history
• The myth of a free water service
• The opposite of free supply: the user pays for all
• The happy medium: a sociably affordable water price
• THE PRIVATE SECTOR: TOO MUCH OR TOO LITTLE INVOLVEMENT?
• The many forms of cooperation between public and private
• Privatization: so frequently debated, so rarely practiced
• To delegate or not to delegate
• Public-private partnership: from fashionable craze to maturity
• Snapshots of the Latin American experience
• Are public-private partnerships appropriate for developing countries?
• WATER: IS THE SERVICE TOO EXPENSIVE?
• Water is not oil
• The price of water in France: the perception and the reality
• What price for what area? The example of France
• Are public operators less expensive? A false evidence
• A price that fails to reflect the scarcity of water
• The developing world: under-financing causes exclusion
• Information and transparency: at the heart of the debate
• Knowing what is being compared
• FUNDERS, OFTEN CRITICIZED BUT INDISPENSABLE
• An overview of public aid for water and sanitation
• Insufficient finance
• The search for new financial initiatives
• When one method displaces another
• FINDING NEW MODELS
• NEW RESOURCES
• Water saving, a resource available now
• Recycled waste water: the only resource that gains from economic development
• Sea water, an unlimited resource
• Using previously unexploited sources
• Rainwater: a useful resource, but not without its risks
• NEW ECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL MODELS
• Mixed funding between service users and taxpayers
• Performance-based payment systems
• Separating the volume sold from the volume pumped
• Increasing water productivity for consumers
• The end of the principle of “user pays for water”?
• HELPING MORE THE DISADVANTAGED
• Developing countries: water and sanitation for the greatest number
• Developed countries: maintaining access to services for the poorest
• GOVERNANCE: AT THE ROOT OF THE PROBLEM, AT THE HEART OF THE SOLUTION
• The pathologies of governance
• Good governance means a proper allocation of roles
• Nothing sustainable can be created without dialogue and consultation
• Transparency: building a long-term relationship of trust
• CONCLUSION: Towards a culture of responsibility

Sat, 2 Dec 2017 14:43:01 -0500