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Voicing in Contrast
Acquiring a Second Language Laryngeal System
Ellen Simon

Academia Press



Contents

• Acknowledgments
• Symbols and Abbreviations
• Preface – What this book is about
• VOICING IN CONTRAST: THE CASE OF DUTCH AND ENGLISH
• Introduction
• The phoneme inventories of Dutch and English
• A note on terminology
• Laryngeal phonetics: The structure of the larynx and vocal fold vibration
• The main laryngeal differences between Dutch and English
• Aspiration
• Prevoicing
• Vowel Length
• Glottal reinforcement and glottal replacement
• Summary
• LARYNGEAL REPRESENTATIONS: THE CONCEPTS OF MARKEDNESS, UNDERSPECIFICATION AND VOICE ASSIMILATION
• Introduction
• Markedness
• Underspecification theory and the unary or binary nature of laryngeal features
• Temporary underspecification
• Inherent Underspecification
• One or more laryngeal features in Dutch and English?
• One feature [voice] in Dutch and English
• Two or more laryngeal features
• Voice assimilation •
• Phonetic and phonological voice assimilation
• Different approaches to voice assimilation
• Summary
• A DATABASE OF SPOKEN DUTCH LEARNER ENGLISH •Introduction
• Compiling a database of spoken Dutch Learner English
• Participants
• Conversational speech
• The set-up
• Conversational topics
• Paralinguistic features
• Vocabulary
• Proficiency in English
• The varieties of Dutch spoken in the conversations
• Word reading task
• Methodology: Data analysis
• Orthographic transcriptions
• Coding
• Number of tokens in the database
• Summary
• ACQUIRING STOPS: ASPIRATION AND PREVOICING
• Introduction
• Aspiration
• VOT in conversational speech
• VOT in isolated words
• Sonorant consonant devoicing
• Glottal replacement
• Prevoicing
• Prevoicing in L1 Dutch
• Prevoicing in Ll English and Dutch Learner English
• Conclusion on prevoicing in DLE
• Summary
• ACQUIRING FRICATIVES: DURATION AND VOCAL FOLD VIBRATION
• Introduction
• The voice contrast in fricatives
• Voiceless fricatives
• Voiced fricatives
• Summary
• FINAL LARYNGEAL NEUTRALISATION
• Introduction
• Contexts of final laryngeal neutralisation in Dutch vs. English
• Final laryngeal neutralisation in Dutch Learner English
• Stops
• Fricatives
• Summary
• REGRESSIVE VOICE ASSIMILATION
• Introduction
• Contexts of regressive voice assimilation in Dutch vs. English
• Regressive voice assimilation in DLE
• Voiceless obstruents as targets
• Voiced obstruents as targets
• Summary
• SONORANT CONSONANTS AS TRIGGERS OF VOICE ASSIMILATION
• Introduction
• The situation in Dutch and English and a comparison with other languages
• Proposals on how sonorants can trigger voice assimilation
• Temporary underspecification of [voice] in sonorants
• The feature [Sonorant Voice]
• The feature [Pharyngeal Expansion]
• Summary of rule-based proposals
• A phonetic approach: Positional neutralisation
• A constraint-based approach
• Assimilation before sonorant consonants in L1 Dutch and DLE: East- vs. West-Flemish speakers
• Voiceless fricatives preceding sonorant consonants
• Voiced fricatives preceding sonorant consonants
• Summary
• PROGRESSIVE DEVOICING
• Introduction
• Progressive devoicing in Dutch vs. English
• Progressive devoicing in Dutch
• Progressive devoicing in English?
• Progressive devoicing in Dutch Learner English
• Summary
• PREVOCALIC VOICE ASSIMILATION
• Introduction
• Prevocalic obstruents in Dutch vs. English
• Prevocalic obstruents in Dutch
• Prevocalic obstruents in English
• Prevocalic voicing in Dutch Learner English
• Prevocalic voice assimilation involving stops
• Prevocalic voice assimilation involving fricatives
• Regressive voice assimilation before voiced stops, sonorant consonants and vowels: A comparison
• Summary
• ACQUIRING LARYNGEAL REPRESENTATIONS OR REALIZATIONS AND SUPPRESSING LARYNGEAL PROCESSES
• Introduction
• Contrasting East- and West-Flemish
• Acquiring laryngeal representations
• Stops
• Fricatives
• Summary of laryngeal representations
• Suppressing laryngeal processes
• L1 Dutch •L1 English
• Dutch Learner English
• Summary
• GENERAL CONCLUSIONS: WHAT THIS STUDY HAS REVEALED AND WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE
• Introduction
• Answers to the questions: What we can conclude from this research
• What needs to be done: Suggestions for further research
• The role of perception
• The role of cross-linguistic universals
• References
• Appendix

Sat, 30 Sep 2017 18:07:14 -0500