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A Pure Mind in a Clean Body
Bodily Care in the Buddhist Monasteries of Ancient India and China
Ann Heirman, Mathieu Torck

Academia Press



Contents

• Introduction
Bodily car practices and objects
• From India to China
• Material culture
• Monastic and lay people
• Beyond daily life
• Overview of sources
• The monastic context
• The lay world
• Outline of chapters
• Bathing Facilities
• Bathing practices in
vinaya texts
• Bathing facilities in the monastic compound
• Assisting a teacher in the bathhouse
• Sutra On Bathing Monks in the Bathhouse
• Bathing facilities in Chinese
vinaya commentaries an disciplinary guidelines
• Practical rules on how to make and use bathing facilities
• Bathing facilities for Chinese
vinaya masters
• Bathing practices in Yijing’s travel account
• A new genre develops:
qing gui, ‘rules of purity’
• Concluding remarks: monks, laymen, and soap
• Laymen and monks
• Bathhouses and soap
• Toilet Facilities
• Toilet practices in
vinaya texts
• Pratimoksa rules on toilet practices
• Practical rules relating to how to make and use toilet facilities
• Toilet practices in
vinaya texts: concluding remarks
• Toilet habits in Chinese
vinaya commentaries and disciplinary guidelines
• Practical rules on how to make and use toilet facilities
• Toilet care for Chinese
vinaya masters
• Toilet habits in Yijing’s travel account
• A new genre develops:
qing gui, ‘rules of purity’
• Concluding remarks: pigsties, paper and wiping sticks
• Toilets and toilet habits in first-millennium China
• Cleaning the Mouth and Teeth
• Dental care in the
vinaya texts
• Why clean one’s teeth?
• The benefits of using tooth wood
• How to make tooth wood
• How to use tooth wood
• What if tooth wood does not solve the problem?
• Are there any alternatives?
• Concluding remarks
• Dental care in Chinese disciplinary texts
• Great (Sutra) of Three Thousand Dignified Observances of a Monk
• Dental care as described by Chinese
vinaya masters
• Concluding remarks: paste, brushes, and tooth wood
• Oral hygiene practices in early imperial China, the
yangshen tradition
• Tools used in oral hygiene
• Shaving the Hair and Trimming the Nails
• Hair and nails in Buddhist disciplinary texts
• Concluding remarks
• Shaving and trimming in early Chinese disciplinary texts
• Shaving the hair as an identity marker
• Chinese
vinaya masters: taking care of hair and nails
• Concluding remarks: identity, beauty, and cleanliness
• Hair care in lay society
• Attitude to nails
• Notes
• Conclusion
• Bibliography

Sat, 2 Dec 2017 14:43:02 -0500