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from unincorporated territory [lukao]
Craig Santos Perez




Omnidawn
2017 • 104 pp. 6 x 9"
Poetry / Poetry - Asian American / Poetry - Australian & Oceanian

$17.95 Paperback, 978-1-63243-041-0



“Native Chamorro poet Santos Perez unveils the fourth book in his series about his homeland, Guåhan (Guam), and his current home, Hawaii. He utilizes eco-poetic, decolonial, diasporic, indigenous, documentary... [continued in Reviews below]”—Alex Crowley, Publishers Weekly

The fourth installment in the Chamorro poet’s series on the history, ecology, and mythology of Guam

from unincorporated territory [lukao] is the fourth book in native Chamorro poet Craig Santos Perez’s ongoing series about his homeland, the Western Pacific Island of Guåhan (Guam), and his current home, Hawai i. He utilizes eco-poetic, decolonial, diasporic, indigenous, documentary, epic, and avant-garde modes to weave stories of creation, birth, migration, food sovereignty, and parenting. This work not only protests the devastating impacts of colonialism, militarism, and environmental injustice across the Pacific, it also expresses a vision of a sustainable and hopeful future.

Reviews / Endorsements

“Native Chamorro poet Santos Perez unveils the fourth book in his series about his homeland, Guåhan (Guam), and his current home, Hawaii. He utilizes eco-poetic, decolonial, diasporic, indigenous, documentary, epic, and avant-garde modes to weave stories of creation, birth, migration, food sovereignty, and parenting.”
—Alex Crowley,
Publishers Weekly

 “Centered on the birth of his daughter, this collection is first and foremost a family story and creation tale, albeit one in which the details of Guam’s ecological and cultural degradation, American militarism and capitalism, and the diaspora of the Chamorro people and language continue to play an important part.”
Publishers Weekly

“Over the past decade, Craig Santos Perez has engaged in a relentless poetic exploration of the history, geography, people, and political implications of his native Guam in a series of books he calls "from incorporated territory." This fourth installment moves beyond verbal means, adding maps, typographical experiments, a glossary, and visual art, pushing at our notions of what qualifies as a text and as a border ("wheredoislandsbeginandend" he asks). Perez continues to speak out as an imperative voice from and for a largely unacknowledged part of the American empire.”
—Craig Morgan Teicher


“In his latest book, Perez explores his fears as a parent raising a child in an era of climate change and militarization in the Pacific. But he’s also hopeful that being raised in Hawaii will teach her about indigenous rights, environmentalism and the demilitarization movement.”
—Courtney Teague,
Honolulu Civil Beat

In “(the birth of Guåhan),” there is a charged insistence in the repetition of the phrase: “Guam” is now named “Guåhan,” which translates as [we] have. This insistence engages with the plasticity of sound as well as meaning. As the prose poem develops, the juxtaposition of historical facts about Guåhan against Juan Malo’s faux-playful tone works to keep the reader unsettled while simultaneously informing them and keeping them close. One feels the political tug-of-war reflected in Guåhan’s history played out via this poetic insistence.”Jose Angel Araguz, The Friday Review

“I wanted to highlight this collection because we here in Minnesota are geographically so far from Guam, and from being an island, but where we live is also occupied territory. We are on Dakota and Ojibwe lands, specifically, and indigenous land in general in the United States and its "territories." Guam is the site of intergenerational, relentless, and toxic military occupation committed by the United States. Too many — most — Americans look away from what U.S. militarism costs people of color and indigenous people within imperial borders.”
Sun Yung Shin, MPR News

“In from unincorporated territory [lukao], the fourth installment of his multivolume epic from unincorporated territory, Craig Santos Perez creates a personal document of witness, shelter, history, and hope. Continuing to deliver the insights into Chamorro experience and U.S. colonial power that define this ten-year project, from unincorporated territory [lukao] stands apart in its tenderness.”
Emily Wolahan, Boston Review

“Santos Perez writes ‘Hinasso’ (imagination, thought, memory, or reflection) painted forwards+backwards and out-scribed in multiple dimensions. Yes, it is true and possible in the land of the Chamorro, in the terrain, mind, culture once colonized, ‘kidnapped,’ and now re-called and re-created by its own will-spirit walk here, in this ‘procession,’ in this knowledge-song, carved Chamorro walk-talk-map. An impossible sacredness in this book, drawn from the collective-body-cartography, is written. Ground-shaking, delight of breath and ecstatic heart.”—Juan Felipe Herrera, Poet Laureate of the United States



CRAIG SANTOS PEREZ, a native Chamorro from the Pacific Island of Guåhan (Guam), co-edited three anthologies of Pacific literature and authored three poetry books: from unincorporated territory [hacha] (2008), from unincorporated territory [saina] (2010, PEN Center USA/Poetry Society of America Literary Prize recipient), and from unincorporated territory [guma’] (2014, American Book Award recipient). He holds an MFA from the U of San Francisco and a Ph.D. in Ethnic Studies from UC Berkeley. He is an Associate Professor in the English Department at the University of Hawai i, M noa.



Mon, 18 Jun 2018 12:44:36 -0500